Martial Arts: Guiding Principles

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Hey, you train MMA? Well, I don’t, and I do, like it when people ask me aforementioned question. Why, you ask? Because often times they are really asking if I ‘do UFC’ lol!!! “Bro! You see that fight?! You do that, right?” What do you mean?! First, I train Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, and I “dabble” in Muay Thai and MMA. Secondly, MMA refers to MIXED martial arts; a combination and application of learned skill sets. I feel that in order to honestly answer yes to this question, one would have to consistently train in more than one martial art.

I do like it when they ask the above question however because it’s a segue to conversation about Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and martial arts in general.

I think that most people who are martial artists respect other martial artists and the arts which they practice. We understand each other’s dedication and commitments to our training and application of the principles behind the art. Out of curiosity I decided to research the governing principles of three martial arts. I chose the three that I thought to be the most would be familiar; Muay Thai, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, and Karate. I also chose these three because I know many people who have trained, or are training, in one or more of these arts.

1. Muay Thai: the governing principles of Muay Thai encourage the practitioner to apply them long-term.

*Dedication
*perseverance
*healthy lifestyle
*heart/passion
*repetition
*mental toughness
*hard work

2. Brazilian jiu-jitsu: Bushido:Ethical Code of Conduct (Japan). The guiding principles of Brazilian jiu jitsu encourage the practitioner to adopt them as a lifestyle; much in the way of Muay Thai.

^Right action
^Courage
^Benevolence
^Respect
^Truthfulness
^Honor
^Loyalty

^Exercise
^Nutrition
^Adequate rest
^Hygiene
^Positive mental attitude

Karate:
Has 20 guiding principles!
Master Funakoshi’s approach stresses spiritual considerations and mental agility over brute strength and technique. Karate practitioners should not rely alone on striking, kicking, blocking, but should focus, as well, on the spiritual aspects of their practice. Attend to yourself and the rest will follow, was Funakoshi’s message for posterity.

What I found in my research was extensive. For all intents and purposes the gist of these guiding principles is: feed your mind and spirit, be a good person, practice good hygiene, work hard in all you do & apply your learning throughout your lifetime.

“Mental calmness, not skill, is the sign of a matured samurai.” – Tsukahara Bokuden

Happy Rolling!

Andrea Harris trains Brazilian jiu-jitsu in the MA area. Currently a blue belt her focus is on competing this year. You can visit her fan page

Thank you Armor Kimonos and Get Diesel Nutrition for supporting my Brazilian Jiu Jitsi journey!

BLACKBELTS FOR BUTTERFLIES Make a difference. Be the difference.

MISSION22 #ijoinedthefight

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